Veterinarian

What is the best way to avoid coming to see us? Regular veterinary care!! Many emergency situations could have been avoided by yearly wellness exams with a family veterinarian.

Does any of this sound familiar?

“My dog is healthy; he never needed to go to the vet! “ (Until he arrived at our hospital comatose and we diagnosed diabetes.)

“I thought my dog was just getting fat!” (Until we found a bleeding abdominal tumor.)

“My cat hates going to the vet!” (He hates going to the emergency vet way more. Trust us. Especially when we find advanced kidney disease.)

“She’s been eating table scraps for years, it never bothered her before!” (Until it caused severe, painful pancreatitis, this could have been avoided with some simple nutritional counseling.)

Regular wellness exams allow your veterinarian to look, feel and test for conditions and diseases that may not be readily apparent to you. Often times, if a condition is diagnosed early, it can be treated successfully, with less stress on you, your pet, and your wallet. Here are some tips from the American Veterinary Medical Association on choosing the right veterinarian for you and your pet. Remember, yearly wellness exams can save your pet’s life!

Finding a veterinarian is relatively easy, especially if you’re using MyVeterinarian.com to search. Recommendations from family and friends can also be of great help. However, finding the right veterinarian for you and your pet is what’s really important. A good veterinary hospital should allow you to take a tour.

Pay attention to how the veterinary team talks to clients and how they act toward the animals in the clinic. Are team members readily available to answer your questions or address your concerns? Do they answer your questions in a way you can understand? One of the most important considerations is how the veterinary team makes you feel – ask yourself if you would be comfortable having your pet in their care.

Are the clinic’s office hours compatible with yours? How do they handle after-hours emergencies – do they see them, or do they refer you to an emergency clinic (it’s best to find this out before you need to know it in an emergency situation)? Do they accept your preferred form of payment? If you have pet insurance, does the veterinary hospital accept that plan?

When choosing your family’s veterinarian, use the same care and criteria that you would in selecting a physician or dentist. Think about what is important to you. Location, office hours, payment options, and the range of medical services provided are all important considerations.